Fight for the Future


The FCC will soon vote to kill net neutrality. But Congress can stop them if they hear from constituents now.

Posted 16:50 EDT on October 26, 2017

Yesterday afternoon the House subcommittee that provides Congressional oversight for the FCC held an important hearing about the agency’s current plans, including current Chairman (and former Verizon lawyer) Ajit Pai’s move to gut Title II net neutrality protections that prevent ISPs from controlling what we do online with throttling, censorship, and extra fees.

With Capitol Hill’s attention now on the FCC, and Pai’s final plan to gut net neutrality protections expected in the coming weeks, it’s extra important that Congress gets flooded with phone calls from Internet users telling them to stand up and defend the open Internet.

We’re also hearing there are key members of Congress considering whether to step in and force Pai to slow down. This means best chance to stop the FCC from breaking the fundamental principle that makes the Internet awesome is to pound Congress with phone calls right now.

You can call your reps easily with just one click here: battleforthenet.com

You’ll see a script on your screen, or you can say something like this:

“I support Title Two net neutrality rules and I urge you to oppose the FCC’s plan to repeal them. Specifically, I’d like you to contact the FCC Chairman and demand he abandon his current plan.”

You can also just call this number directly and enter your zipcode to get connected to your legislators: 202-930-8550.

If you run a website, blog, tumblr, or forum, help spread the word by putting up a sticky post, or use one of these widgets, ads, or banners: https://www.battleforthenet.com/#join

Ajit Pai is expected to circulate the text of his rule killing net neutrality on November 22, the day before Thanksgiving. Once that happens, it will move to a vote at the FCC’s open meeting in December, and it will become much much harder to stop him.

It’s clear that the FCC remains set on killing net neutrality. But Congress can stop the FCC from gutting the rules that keep the web open, affordable, and awesome.


Share on: